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Denmark
397 Posts

Posted - 26 October 2011 :  20:34:25  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

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Low watt, high power server - Part 2: Watt and heat

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This is blog post number 2 in my series about the build of my new home server setup and in this blog post I will look at what wattages and heat the parts in the server is having, so in this post i will look at the watt and heat for disk drives, interface cards and RAM blocks.



How much wattage are the SSD and HDD using?
So to better know how much the disk drives are using i then look at what drives i was having and found that there was 4 different hard disk where there was 2 of each model and then i have 2 of the SSD.
So by this i can then measure the use of 2 disks at the same time and then just divide the result with 2 and then have a bit more precise measurement then if i only have one drive. So the setup is this, one Fluke 789 meter is measuring the 12V and another Fluke 789 is measuring the 5V and a Fluke 177 to measuring the amps for the 12V wire and then a Fluke 287 to measuring the amps for the 5V wire.
On the photo below you can see the 4 meter for measuring the disk drives and on the right there is the Fluke 345 Power Quality Clamp Meter there is measuring the wattages on the 230V AC.

www.tooms.dk.hdd.fluke.meter.setup.jpg">
I have done the measurement by connection 2 disk drive to the system and then using the average function on the fluke meters by first have the drives doing nothing (idle) and measuring the average amps over 10 minutes and then i have done the same 10 minutes average measurement when the drives was at the highest load that i was able to do by using the IOmeter software to run a benchmark.

Model

Size GB

Type

RPM

Disk Size

Watt Idle

Watt full load

Seagate Barracude 7200.9

80 GB

HDD

7200

3.5"

5.2944 W

6.7001 W

Western Digital Caviar SE WD800

80 GB

HDD

7200

3.5"

5.0583 W

5.6027 W

Western Digital Raptor WD360

36 GB

HDD

10000

3.5"

6.6774 W

8.8369 W

Seagate Momentus 7200.2

160 GB

HDD

7200

2.5"

1.0944 W

3.4462 W

Crucial M4 256GB SSD

256 GB

SSD

-

2.5"

0.5935 W

1.5882 W

So it is not just marketing talk that the SSD's are using much less wattage then the old hard disk drives and one SSD can have the same performance as many hard disk drives so with that the saving will be even better.
My old server is having 4x Seagate Barracude 7200.10 disks in a raid setup and that will give number around 20.8W in idle and 26,8W with high load for the disks, so if replaced by 3x SSD's there will use 1,7W idle and 4,7W with high load.... so this will give a saving at around 15-25W, This is a nice saving on the change from harddisk drives to SSD disk.
The only issue is the cost of the SSD, small GB size and limit lift time.




How much heat is there then coming from the disks?

So to make a comparable heat profile i have then power all the disk on for 4 hours in idle mode with just the power connector on and not any pc and then i run the disk at full load for 30 minutes to get them to heat up.
Then i have taken a thermal image with a Fluke TI25 thermal image camera of each pair of disks.
The image temperature color scale is set low point as 20 and high point as 65 degrades for each image to make sure colors and images are comparable.

HDD: Western Digital Caviar SE WD800 80GB 7200RPM 3.5"
www.tooms.dk.hdd35.wd.wd800jd2d.jpg">
The graph on the right shows the temperature across the to disks on the red line.
Seems to have okey temperature for 3,5" and the heat is coming from the main chip.


HDD: Western Digital Raptor WD360 36GB 10000RPM 3.5"
www.tooms.dk.hdd35.wd.raptor.10krpm.jpg" />
The graph on the right shows the temperature across the to disks on the red line.
The print board is have some hot spots, but for 10krpm disk i am a bit surprised that it is not hotter then this.


HDD: Seagate Barracude 7200.9 80GB 7200RPM 3.5"
www.tooms.dk.hdd35.seagate.barracude.7200.9.jpg" />
The graph on the right shows the temperature across the to disks on the red line.
Wow that chip is getting very hot and the center of them is 72 degrades so if your using disks like this then your better make sure there is some type of air cooling across the disk.
This is when the disk is placed in free air on the floor so i can only guess that they will get even more hot when inside a computer case.


HDD: Seagate Momentus 7200.2 160GB 7200RPM 2.5"
www.tooms.dk.hdd25.seagate.momentus.7200.2.jpg" />
The graph on the right shows the temperature across the to disks on the red line.
This is disks from a laptop and it is easy to see why laptops get so hot when they have hard disk drives installed.


SSD: Crucial M4 256GB 2.5"
www.tooms.dk.ssd25.crucial.m4.256gb.jpg" />
The graph on the right shows the temperature across the to disks on the red line.
Wow, nice to see the SSD are so much cooler then the HDD's and if you look at the graph on the right you can see how low and cool the drives are in comparison to the other hard disk drives.

So this is super nice that i don't have the hard disk drives high heat in this new server and is just having the nice and cool SSD there is using alot less watt..


Wattages for RAM blocks.
By change the amount of memory on the mainboard and taking a number of reading with the Fluke 345 Power Quality Clamp Meter on the main 230V AC power, I have then calculated that 8GB(2x4GB) Corsair 8GB DDR3 1333Mhz XMS3 is using around 1,727W and 16GB(4x4GB) Corsair 8GB DDR3 1333Mhz XMS3 is using 3,454W, so from this it seems the ram blocks is not using much wattages and i think that the 8gb will cost more than the 16gb will in the long run because if there is only 8gb ram then the disk system will do a lot more swapping to disk and by this use extra watts.
so why not use 8gb blocks, it is because the 8gb blocks cost too much and if the prices was not that high then i will have installed 32GB(4x8GB) on the system, but this may come as a upgrade at a later time when the prices has come down, so for now it is only 16GB


Wattages for network cards.
So by doing the same as when taking measurement of the memory i have the cards changed around and taken a number of reading with the Fluke 345 Power Quality Clamp Meter on the main 230V AC power and from this i have found that the network cards cost around 2.5 to 4.5W per card and in the table below you can see the cards that i have tested with and how many watts they using.

Model

Interface

Ports

Total Watt

Watt per port

Intel PRO/1000 PT Desktop Adaptor

PCIe 1 Lane

1

2,272W

2,272W

Intel PRO/1000 MT Desktop Adaptor

PCI 32 bit

1

4,454W

4,454W

Intel I340-T4 Server Adaptor

PCIe 4 Lane

4

4,363W

1,090W

So because i have to make a Etherchannel of 3-4 ports between the server and the switch i will then use the Intel I340-T4 server adaptor as they have the lowest watt per port and i can use just one card and not have to use 4 cards, also it seems that Intel writes that is done a lot around the power management to keep the wattages down and be green and they list in the specs. That the card is using 4.3W and that is just what i have measured to use so it seems my readings for the cards are matching very well.


In the next post I will look at what power supply to use and the heat and cooling of the Mainboard, chipset, CPU, RAM and so on.


To see the other blog post in this series then click on the comment link and you will find a comment with links to each post in the series.

Tooms

Denmark
397 Posts

Posted - 26 October 2011 :  20:52:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Links to blog post for this series


Low watt, high power server - Part 1: Need new server setup
http://www.tooms.dk/Tblog/Showblog1.asp?BlogID=201110091828348325


Low watt, high power server - Part 2: Watt and heat
http://www.tooms.dk/Tblog/Showblog1.asp?BlogID=201110252324515723


Low watt, high power server - Part 3: SATA HDD activity LED
http://www.tooms.dk/Tblog/Showblog1.asp?BlogID=201111082030033196



Thomas Bøjstrup Johansen
Any comment or statements is my own and have no relationship to my workplace
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